Lakeside Park

Flood waters rise at Lakeside Park in Pell City, covering the walking bridge, park benches, roadways, parking areas, and fields. Photo by U. Glidewell

Several days of rain pushed the normally low winter Logan Martin Lake levels to flood proportions over the weekend, causing damage to boathouses, docks and other property along the shore. 

With the water receding, the cleanup begins. Some homeowners have lost items from their property, including boats, kayaks and sometimes the dock itself. Other smaller items wash up on the shoreline. City employees, members of the Logan Martin Lake Protection Agency, homeowners and volunteers are working to get areas clean.

The city of Pell City will have two dumpsters available at 309 19th Street South for the next two weeks. Residents can bring flood debris and material out of the lake, preferably bagged if feasible. Dumping of construction debris, paint or batteries is not allowed. 

“We’re doing what we can as a city to help our community,” said Greg Gossett, Pell City Street Department Supervisor. 

Logan Martin Lake Protection Agency is providing bags for use in cleanup efforts, which they brought to the Pell City Municipal Complex. 

According to the LMLPA, the recent high lake level was 471.7 feet. The highest level on record was 475.31 feet on April 6, 1977. Regular summer pool levels are around 465 feet. 

Logan Martin Lake is a flood control lake. Water levels are lowered in during the rainy winter season, so that when a large amount of rain does occur, the lake level can be risen to not cause damage to private property or the dam structure. 

The Coosa Riverkeeper stated that when Alabama Power originally constructed the lake, they acquired property rights and flood easements which legally allow them to flood the lake up to certain levels. The Alabama Power Fee Ownership Elevation is between 465 feet and 473 feet, varying by property. The flood easement elevation is 473 feet to 490 feet. Historically, levels have never risen above 475 feet.

Some property may have more extension flood damage. For additional resources and information, including information on contamination from flood water, visit www.aces.edu/blog/topics/business/alabama-extension-flood-recovery-resources.  

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